First Edition of the First Announcement of the Discovery of X-Rays
RÖNTGEN, Wilhelm Conrad. Eine Neue Art von Strahlen. Von Dr. W[ilhelm]. [Konrad] Röntgen. O.O. Professor an der K. Universitat Wurzburg. Verlag und Druck der Stahel'schen K. Hof-Und Universitats-Buch-Und Kunsthandlung
First edition, offprint issue. Octavo (8 15/16 x 5 15/16 inches; 228 x 151 mm). 10, [2, blank] pp.

Original yellow printed wrappers. Wrappers a bit sunned and with some minor staining. A few creases at upper corner of front wrapper. Small chip to back wrapper. Light pencil ownership signature on front wrapper. Most pages with a small crease at bottom outer corner. Upper outer corner with a light crease to most pages. Some mild browning to a few leaf edges and along small crease. Minor tape residue to inside wrapper corner. Otherwise, near fine.

"While performing experiments with a Crookes vacuum tube, a type of cathode-ray tube, Röntgen observed that some agent produced in the tube was causing barium platinocyanide crystals to fluorescence was caused by unknown rays (which he named "x-rays") originating from the spot where cathode rays hit the glass wall of the vacuum tube. He announced his discovery in the present paper, which described the rays' photographic properties and their amazing ability to penetrate all substances, even living flesh. Although he was unable to determine the true physical nature of the rays, Röntgen was certain that he had discovered something entirely new, a belief soon confirmed by the work of other scientists such as Becquerel, Laue and the Curies. for his discovery, Röntgen was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics for 1901.

"Röntgen submitted his paper for publication in the obscure Sitzungs-Berichte of the Würzburg Physical-Medical Society, a strategy deliberately employed to assure fast publication. Offprints of the article were printed at the same time, which Röntgen mailed (along with several x-ray photographs) to a number of scientific colleagues; the [first edition] offprint has wrappers but no title-page, and is dated "Ende 1895." 'It was this separate printing, and the following four additional printings in five issues, that were primarily responsible for the rapid dissemination of the news of Röntgen's discovery." (Klickstein, p. 62).'" —Haskell Norman Collection, 1841.

Ferguson, Bibliotheca Chemica,. Garrison and Morton. Norman Library. PMM 380.

HBS # 67953 $8,500