Item #69074 Rights of Man. Thomas PAINE.
Rights of Man
Rights of Man
Rights of Man

Three Important Works by Paine

Rights of Man. Being an Answer to Mr. Burke's Attack on the French Revolution. [Bound with] Rights of Man; Part the Second. Combining Principle and Practice. [Bound with] Letter Addressed to the Addressers of the Late Proclamation.

London: Printed for H.D. Symonds, Paternoster-Row, 1792.

Full Description:

PAINE, Thomas. Rights of Man. Being an Answer to Mr. Burke's Attack on the French Revolution. [Bound with] Rights of Man; Part the Second. Combining Principle and Practice. [Bound with] Letter Addressed to the Addressers of the Late Proclamation. London: Printed for H.D. Symonds, Paternoster-Row, 1792.

Very early reprints of the first two titles; first Symonds edition of the third title. Twelvemo (7 9/16 x 4 1/4 inches;192 x 109 mm). [2], 78; 91, [3, appendix]; 40 pp. First edition of the Symonds/Rickman 40-page edition of the Letter Addressed to the Addressers, title page with "Proclamation" measuring 5.4 cm. long. This title was issued the same year in London by Jordan in a 40-page edition and by Symonds in a 78-page edition, although no copies are known to exist of the Jordan edition. Bound without half titles for all works.

Full contemporary sheep, rebacked. Newer red morocco spine label, lettered in gilt. Boards a bit rubbed. Corners bumped. A few pages opened rough. Internally very clean. Overall, a very good copy in a contemporary American binding.

Originally published in 1791 as a reply to Edmund Burke's Reflections on the French Revolution, as a vindication of the French Revolution, and as a critique of the British system of government, Rights of Man is unquestionably one of the great classics on the subject of democracy. Paine created a language of modern politics that brought important issues to the common man and the working classes. Employing direct, vehement prose, Paine defended popular rights, national independence, revolutionary war, and economic growth-all of which were considered, at the time, to be dangerous and even seditious issues.

The second part constitutes Paine's revolutionary advocacy of representative government, and an appeal to the English to overthrow their monarchy. It was so popular with English radicals that 200,000 copies were sold by 1793. Concerning the third title, the 'late proclamation' was the royal proclamation against seditious writings issued May 21, 1792, and was directed particularly against the second part of Rights of Man.

Regarding the third work "This attack on the evils of the English government is practically a third part of his Rights of man." (Howes)

Howes P28. PMM 241.

HBS 69074.

$2,500.

Price: $2,500.00

Item #69074

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